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20121222
20121230
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KQEH (PBS) 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions
of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites.
from doing so. >> why have we failed so miserably in terms of government's role? >> because there's an extraordinary stigma that's attached to admitting you have a problem. that's whether it's alcohol or drug abuse or whether it's other types of mental illness. there's still such a stigma attached to it, to getting treatment. whether that treatment be conversational, therapy or whether it be prescription medications or a combination of both. that i think even where we offer services as governor, we do offer and pay for a lot of mental health services as a state government, as a federal government. lots of people won't access it because they feel stigmatized by it. part of this national discussion has to be that mental illness is no different than having cancer or having any other disease. no one would ever think i don't want anybody to know i have cancer so i'm not going to go to the doctor. yet, with mental illness, we treat people differently. that's what we immediate to get over as a society. >> now, one of the country's leading experts on public policy and mental health is the
will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important effect on state budgets. >> reporter: the pew center on the states reports around 18% of federal grants to states would be subject to sequestration's spending cuts. that works out to about $7.5 billion the states could ultimately lose. >> the real worry right now for states is that as many states start there legislative sessions next month is jus
in western iraq staged a mass protest today against the shi-ite-dominated government, the third in less than a week. protesters filled the streets in ramadi in anbar province chanting "topple the regime." the demonstrations began after police arrested ten bodyguards assigned to the sunni finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of r
" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. that could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the pres
opposition groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, opposit
observation on the unchanging nature of governance comes in its screen play based in part on the book "team of rivals." recently, the script received the new york film critics circle award, one of what will doubtless be many honors. tony first came to most people's attention with the epic play "angels in america," a devastating account of the a.i.d.s. epidemic while it was at its worst. tony received both a tony award and the pulitzer prize for drama as well as a primetime emmy award for its television adaptation on hbo. that was some 20 years ago. in the years since, tony's reputation as one of our most accomplished and sometimes controversial modern play writes has only grown. welcome. >> thank you. >> you said you worked six years. how did you go about the research? >> i just started reading. we started with doris' book. i was curious to read it. it's a great read and a great book, but it's the definition of a thing that can turn into a 2 1/2 hour script. i knew immediately from what i had read there was going to be too much material if we tried to cover the whole thing and the civil war
and the republicans in future negotiations. and raised a question of whether anyone can get a governing majority in the house of representatives when it comes to the budget. those are really serious matters. now it does go to the senate where harry reid and mcconnell can try to come to some, you know, functional su render for republicans and kick the cannon a lot of other issues and see if that can pass in the next ten days am buts that still has to pass the house. and so i think the chances of backing off of the cliff are higher than they ever have been. >> you know, i listened to some of these recalcitrant house republicans today, mark. and they were saying, i was to the going to vote for a tax increase when my constituent was never have gone along with that. >> well, i think there are two realities, here, judy. first of all there's a lot of republicans, more than a few democrats who are terrified of one thing, that's being primary, primary opponent without going to run on your right if you are a republican. on your left if you are a democrat. it's really become a problem for republicans. beca
,000 an ounce next year. the reason? >> monetary easing. all these governments have debt and there's only one way to pay it back and it's to devalue their own currency. and it's a race to the bottom. >> reporter: there are other factors that could also help support gold prices. central banks worldwide have been boosting their gold holdings to diversify their portfolios, and protect against inflation. this year, central banks bought roughly 500 metric tons of gold, up 8% from last year. in addition, many small investors are buying gold as a safehaven from global instability. >> political certainty is a major driving factor. it is not just here. but, in the western europe, and in the far east. and, in china. >> reporter: strong demand for gold exchange traded funds has also helped support prices. the spider gold trust-- ticker gld-- has $75 billion in assets. and it's is backed by physical gold. it also helps that some hedge funds with bylaws prohibiting them from buying futures, can buy gold e.t.f.'s. >> so there are some people that were restricted before. they're not now, and that's supporti
will roil the economy with a series of fights over taxes, government shut downs and debt limit increases. >> i actually had one hedge fund manager say to me, "oh, they'd never allow to go over the cliff, because they, they being members of congress, would be embarrassed by this. and i don't think wall street understands what it actually takes to embarrass a member of congress on these kinds of issues. >> reporter: if an agreement isn't reached by january 3, the new congress will have to deal with the problem, potentially delaying action even further. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: our guest tonight is bullish for 2013. he's wayne kaufman, chief market analyst at john thomas financial. >> so, wayne, give us your bullish case. make the case for us for why you see the dow and the sep up by as much as 12% in 2013. >> well, i do think there's a very good chance that the major index is the s&p and the dow make new all-time highs, sometime in 2013. you have been going over the housing market doing much better but the entire construction industry, the whole building sector is also
for top talent. wal-mart could be in trouble in india. the indian government looking into whether wal-mart's lobbying activities in the u.s. violated indian laws. shares of wal-mart closed fractionally higher. smith and wesson is buying back an additional $15 million worth of stock, on top of the $20 million repurchase program it recently completed. smith and wesson's shares have fallen nearly 10% since the newtown connecticut shootings. investors bought up gold today, as a safe place to park money while washington lawmakers spar over the fiscal cliff. the precious metal settled $3 higher at $1,663 an ounce. gold prices are on pace for an annual rise of about 6%, the smallest annual gain since 2008. and, supply concerns pushed palladium prices to a nine-month high. investors are worried that tight supplies from the world's top two producers and steady demand from the auto sector could mean higher prices in 2013. it settled at $708 an ounce: over the past year the metal has rising about 7.5%. and finally, for the second day in row the ishares emerging market e.t.f. ended higher. and th
for investors? >> we think the stock is trading at 50% of book. the government, awns, sold their position. ben mochet came in from metlife, and he's reall?รก changing the culture there. we think there's a great upside to the it. >> susie: royal dutch shell, tell us why you like this. i know it has a big, fat dividend, and you do like dividend stocks. dividend, and you do likdividene to? >> it's a dividend play, and the energy sector did poorly last year. we were wrong on the energy sector because the economy has been limping along. it's the cheapest name in the global energy names and we think the stock really deserves attention going into next year with a big dividend and an $80 target. >> susie: all right, you arey bullish, but i have to ask you what worries you? is there any wild card out there that gives you concern? >> well, i wake up at 4:00 a.m. with a laundry list. we have the-- i wasn't going to say "fiscal cliff" because i have to pate dollar in our jar at the office-- the fiscal cliff issue. mideast, we don't know what's going to happen with the iranian card. north korea feels like
... the government didn't work anymore. >> by that time, the christians are so numerous that they can't possibly be eradicated; they've already grown that much. so, in a sense, the persecution really doesn't catch up until it's already too late. >> narrator: by now, the jesus movement had spread its message to every corner of the roman empire. >> the last decades of the third century, you get a great insurge of people into christianity. there are some scholars who think that, in egypt, for example, by the 320's, there would actually be a majority of christians-- maybe a rather slight majority, but nonetheless a sizable number of christians. >> narrator: the turning point in the history of the christian movement occurred in the first decades of the fourth century. it was a transformation filled with ironies. it was brought about by a roman general who worshipped, not jesus, but apollo, the god of the sun. >> one of the most surprising christian heroes in the entire tradition, i think, is constantine. he is, first of all, a successful general. he is, also, the son of a successful general and at th
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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